Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45605
Title: Utilization of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes in ruminant feeding
Author: Chumakov, S.
Ballesteros, E.
Rodriguez Sanchez, J.E.
Chavez, A.
Zhang, M.
Pettit, B.M.
Fofanov, Y.
Issue Date: 2006
Abstract: Finding relations among gene expressions involves the definition of the similarity between experimental data. A simplest similarity measure is the Correlation Coefficient. It is able to identify linear dependences only; moreover, is sensitive to experimental errors. An alternative measure, the Shannon Mutual Information (MI), is free from the above mentioned weaknesses. However, the calculation of MI for continuous variables from the finite number of experimental points, N, involves an ambiguity arising when one divides the range of values of the continuous variable into boxes. Then the distribution of experimental points among the boxes (and, therefore, MI) depends on the box size. An algorithm for the calculation of MI for continuous variables is proposed. We find the optimum box sizes for a given N from the condition of minimum entropy variation with respect to the change of the box sizes. We have applied this technique to the gene expression dataset from Stanford, containing microarray data at 18 time points from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures (Spellman et al.,). We calculated MI for all of the pairs of time points. The MI analysis allowed us to identify time patterns related to different biological processes in the cell. " 2006 American Institute of Physics.",,,,,,"10.1063/1.2356392",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45605","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846527894&partnerID=40&md5=17b242493e3d35676ecfdca730242ab7",,,,,,,,"AIP Conference Proceedings",,"25
30",,"854",,"Scopus",,,,,,"Gene expression; Mutual information",,,,,,"Using mutual information to discover temporal patterns in gene expression data",,"Conference Paper" "47392","123456789/35008",,"Íñiguez, G., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel. km. 15.5, Guadalajara 45020 Jalisco, Mexico; Vaca, P., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel. km. 15.5, Guadalajara 45020 Jalisco, Mexico",,"Iniguez, G.
Vaca, P.",,"2001",,"This study investigated the effectiveness of composting swine large intestines and wet agave bagasse using a layering method. This is a modified static-pile method that avoids the need to mix the initial raw materials by piling alternate layers of swine large intestines and wet agave bagasse as a bulking agent. Temperature profiles were monitored to assess the progress of the composting process. The quality of the compost after 102 days was evaluated on the basis of chemical and microbial analyses and germination, initial plant growth and root development studies of Lycopersicum esculentum and Beta vulgaris seeds. The results indicate that within a ratio of 100 kg swine large intestines per 150 kg wet agave bagasse, thermophilic conditions were attained, and the intestines were completely composted. After composting, the material had an earthy smell with a dark brown color and was relatively dry (22% dry matter). Based on the initial weight of raw materials and the final weight of the compost, there was a 56% decrease. No Escherichia coli, Shigella sp, Salmonella sp, neither total or fecal coliforms were detected after composting. Water extracts from composted swine large intestines reduced the percentage of germination of Lycopersicum esculentum seeds. However Beta vulgaris seeds were not inhibited as shown on germination, initial plant growth and root development studies. This research has shown that swine large intestines can be composted with wet agave bagasse on farm conditions without difficulty. In the same respect, composting can be a better alternative to traditional methods of disposal such as rendering and landfilling.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45613","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0346468827&partnerID=40&md5=eb9c31ea158c7d92badc273a11e38d3c",,,,,,"2",,"Revista Internacional de Contaminacion Ambiental",,"109
116",,"17",,"Scopus",,,,,,"Agave bagasse; Composting; Germination; Swine large intestine",,,,,,"Utilización de subproductos de la industria tequilera. Parte 4. Biodegradación del intestino grueso de cerdos con bagazo de agave húmedo",,"Article" "47397","123456789/35008",,"Íñiguez, G., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, km 15.5 carretera G.-Nogales, Guadalajara 45020 Jalisco, Mexico; Flores, S., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, km 15.5 carretera G.-Nogales, Guadalajara 45020 Jalisco, Mexico; Martínez, L., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, km 15.5 carretera G.-Nogales, Guadalajara 45020 Jalisco, Mexico",,"Iniguez, G.
Flores, S.
Martinez, L.",,"2003",,"Tanneries have the non-enviable reputation of being one of the dirtiest and bad smelliest industries, and thus, the Official Mexican Norm (NOM-052-ECOL-1993) classifies tannery waste (No.RP4.2/ 01) as hazardous residues. By weight, tannery residuals come mainly from the preparation of the hide for hardening. This waste is mainly composed of hair and flesh material. Using two wooden cells, 2.5 m x 2.5 m x 1.5 m high, the discarded flesh material was subjected to a layered biodegradation process, placing a layer of agave bagasse, followed by one of "green compost" (pig intestins) and another one of discarded flesh material. This sequence was repeated until a height of 0.7 m was reached. One ton of tannery solid waste was used per cell. Temperature changes were daily monitored during the biodegradation process. Microbial and chemical analyses were performed on the compost, as well as germination studies, using root elongation and initial growth of Raphanus sativus seeds to evaluate the compost maturity index. After a 42 day curing period of the biodegradation product, there were neither germination nor radical growth problems (p > 0.05). Only the hypocotyl growth was lightly affected by the material of the pile 2. The biomass production (g of dry matter) was higher (p < 0.05) for the components of the piles 1 and 2 in comparison to the control treatment (116.5, 102.1 g vs. 88.1 g). At the end of 154 days of thermophilic degradation, the discarded flesh material was completely decomposed, obtaining a blackish product with a smell and texture similar to a gardening soil. It was determined that the total lost of dry matter was in average about 67.3 % for the two piles considering the initial and final weights of the ingredients. In both piles final product, no organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella sp. or fecal coliforms were detected, although the presence of Escherichia coli was found. The most probable number of fecal coliforms for piles 1 and 2 was 7 and 43 per gram of sample, respectively. From the present research work it could be concluded that the layers biodegradation process, may be come a technically and economically viable alternative for the tanneries in the management and final disposal of discarded flesh material and, at the same time, producing with this process a product with agronomic potential.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45618","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0348218932&partnerID=40&md5=ef87f22faa4c2bbd3744bc9358ae4462",,,,,,"2",,"Revista Internacional de Contaminacion Ambiental",,"83
91",,"19",,"Scopus",,,,,,"Agave bagasse; Biodegradation; Leather processing; Tanneries",,,,,,"Utilization of by-products from the tequila industry. Part 5. Biodegradation of Fleshing materials from tanneries [Utilización de subproductos de la industria tequilera. Parte 5. Biodegradación del material de descarne de la industria de curtiduría]",,"Article" "47399","123456789/35008",,"Iñiguez-Covarrubias, G., Universidad De Guadalajara, Departamento De Madera, Celulosa Y Papel, Km. 15.5 carretera, C.P. 45020, Guadalajara, Jalisico, Mexico; Lange, S.E., USDA, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53705, United States; Rowell, R.M., USDA, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53705, United States",,"Iniguez-Covarrubias, G.
Lange, S.E.
Rowell, R.M.",,"2001",,"Agave bagasse was successfully separated into fractions that were used in sheep feeding trials. Agave bagasse can be substituted for corn stubble in the sheep's diet which resulted in improved weight gain. Agave bagasse was also processed into long and short fiber fractions with a hammermill and fiberboards of medium and high specific gravities being produced. Medium specific gravity agave fiberboards had moisture and mechanical properties comparable to medium specific gravity fiberboards made using aspen fiber. All high specific gravity agave fiberboards made from short or long fibers were stronger in bending than the ANSI standard for hardboards. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.Agave bagasse was successfully separated into fractions that were used in sheep feeding trials. Agave bagasse can be substituted for corn stubble in the sheep's diet which resulted in improved weight gain. Agave bagasse was also processed into long and short fiber fractions with a hammermill and fiberboards of medium and high specific gravities being produced. Medium specific gravity agave fiberboards had moisture and mechanical properties comparable to medium specific gravity fiberboards made using aspen fiber. All high specific gravity agave fiberboards made from short or long fibers were stronger in bending than the ANSI standard for hardboards.",,,,,,"10.1016/S0960-8524(00)00137-1",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45620","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035285321&partnerID=40&md5=4f160e500b62f8c04cc1c10e61ddb34d
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=med4&AN=11211072",,,,,,"1",,"Bioresource Technology",,"25
32",,"77",,"Scopus
WOS
MEDLINE",,,,"Index Medicus;Animal Feed;Animals;Biotechnology/mt [Methods];Cellulose/ch [Chemistry];Humidity;Sheep;Water/me [Metabolism];Wood",,"Agave bagasse; Agave bagasse pith; Agave fiber; Fiberboards; Tequila byproducts; Water swelling",,,,,,"Utilization of byproducts from the tequila industry: Part 1: Agave bagasse as a raw material for animal feeding and fiberboard production",,"Article" "47394","123456789/35008",,"Mejía Rodríguez, Jorge Antonio Universidad de Guadalajara",,"Mejía Rodríguez, Jorge Antonio Universidad de Guadalajara",,"2004",,,,,,,,,,"0187-7674","http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45615",,,"Español",,,,"90",,"Confines de relaciones internacionales y ciencia política",,"17-27",,"17",,"CLASE",,,,,,,,"Economía de energéticos",,,"La anhelada reforma eléctrica en México","La anhelada reforma eléctrica en México: ¿Hacia una mayor participación privada en el sector?",,"journalArticle" "47402","123456789/35008",,"Martínez, Y., Universidad de Granma, Apartado Postal 21, Bayamo, Granma, C.P 85300, Cuba; Valdivie, M., Instituto de Ciencia Animal, Apartado Postal 24, San José de Las Lajas, La Habana, Cuba; Martínez, O., Universidad de Granma, Apartado Postal 21, Bayamo, Granma, C.P 85300, Cuba; Estarrón, M., Centro de Investigacion y Asistencia en Tecnologia y Diseno Del Estado de Jalisco, A. C. Av. Normalistas 800, Guadalajara, Jal CP. 44100, Mexico; Córdova, J., Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Ing. Química, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico",,"Martinez, Y.
Valdivie, M.
Martinez, O.
Estarron, M.
Cordova, J.",,"2010",,"In order to use pumpkin seed meal (PSM) in broiler chicken feeding in Cuba, as partial substitute of soybean cake and imported plant oil, 1.20 Cobb-500chicks, of one day of age were used. During 49 d, they were allotted according to completely randomized design into two treatments and three repetitions. The treatments consisted of diets, with levels of inclusion of 0 and 10% of pumpkin seed meal. No significant differences were observed between treatments the viability (95%), final liveweight (2268 and 2265 g/bird), feed intake (4837 y 4831 g/bird), feed conversion (2.13), carcass weight (.1634 and 1625 g/bird), breast yield (23.73 and 23.52%) and weight of thigh + leg (511 and. 519 g/bird). The excessive abdominal, fat diminished with the inclusion of 1.0% pumpkin seed meal. No differences were observed in the sensorial quality of the meat from the breast and thigh. The results obtained suggested the utilization up to 10% of pumpkin seed meal in broiler chicken diets, not changing the productive performance and the sensorial quality of the meat.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45623","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959741402&partnerID=40&md5=1a0d3f18dc7644573c6bf503cf7736fc",,,,,,"4",,"Cuban Journal of Agricultural Science",,"387
392",,"44",,"Scopus",,,,,,"Chicken; Pumpkin; Seed",,,,,,"Utilization of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seed in broiler chicken diets",,"Article" "47401","123456789/35008",,"Valdez, O.D.M., Centro Universitario del Sur, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Enrique Arreola Silva 883, Ciudad Guzmán, Jalisco, 49000, Mexico; Chavira, J.S., Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, km. 5, Carretera Victoria, Mante, Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, 87000, Mexico; Salem, A.Z.M., Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Mexico",,"Valdez, O.D.M.
Chavira, J.S.
Salem, A.Z.M.",,"2013",,"Added fibrolytic enzymes (e.g. cellulases, xylanases) to diets for ruminants have been viewed with considerable skepticism for years. Despite the considerable number of studies conducted recently, the mechanisms by which fibrolytic enzymes could improve fiber digestion in the rumen have not been clearly elucidated and seem to be affected by several factors such as the type of enzyme and the nature of the substrate. Inconsistent responses are thought to be due in part to differences in physical and chemical conditions under which the enzymes have been evaluated; for example, several studies showed that the highest activity of carbohydrate degrading enzymes was at pH from 3 to 7 for -glucanase and from 6 to 7 for xylanase. It suggests that these enzymes seem to work better at close to neutral ruminal pH conditions. In this chapter, we review some of the most relevant aspects about exogenous fibrolytic enzymes and its important influence over ruminant nutrition. " 2013 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/45622
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84895283233&partnerID=40&md5=56361f03857568c66b9b22c3125def80
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