Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/42387
Title: Iridaceae 'Out of Australasia'? phylogeny, biogeography, and divergence time based on plastid DNA sequences
Author: Andrade, E.
Blanco, O.
de Lucio, O.G.
Solis, C.
Rocha, M.F.
Zavala, E.P.
Issue Date: 2010
Abstract: Epitaxial thin films of Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47) (PZT) ferroelectric ceramic were successfully grown on Sr(Nb)TiO3 (SNTO) single crystal substrates by an high-pressure RF sputtering technique. Pure O2 was used as working gas at a pressure above 1 Torr. The crystalline films properties were evaluated by ?-2? DRX scans. From these measurements we concluded that the PZT layers were single crystalline and c-axis oriented with a (001)PZT
(001)SNTO crystallographic relationship. Film composition and film-substrate interface characteristics were studied by bombardment of the samples with a 2560 keV 3He+ beam. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) technique was applied to fit the experimental spectra in order to deduce the elemental depth concentration profile of the films. The high-pressured technique represents a useful and capable method to obtaining in situ epitaxial ferroelectric thin film with high quality structural, compositional and dielectric properties, without post deposit treatment. " 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",,,,,,"10.1016/j.nimb.2010.02.109",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/42387","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953324190&partnerID=40&md5=60d32606c957585ac39e0c847ce0cd86",,,,,,"11-dic",,"Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms",,"1964
1966",,"268",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,"Crystalline properties; High-pressure sputtering; PZT thin films; RBS",,,,,,"Ion beam analysis of high pressure deposition of epitaxial PZT thin films",,"Article" "45244","123456789/35008",,"Padilla-Rosas, M., Genética Humana, Escuela de Odontología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud-Universidad de Guadalajara, México.; Jimenez-Santos, C.I., Genética Humana, Escuela de Odontología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud-Universidad de Guadalajara, México.; García-González, C.L., Genética Humana, Escuela de Odontología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud-Universidad de Guadalajara, México.",,"Padilla-Rosas, M.
Jimenez-Santos, C.I.
García-Gonzalez, C.L.",,"2006",,"Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/43465","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745884109&partnerID=40&md5=26eda60457c860403f88a670b1e05ed1
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745106600&partnerID=40&md5=525d64284291ce3ee656e04470921611
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=med5&AN=16648760",,,,,,"3",,"Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal.",,"E239
242",,"11",,"Scopus
MEDLINE",,,,"Dental Journals, Index Medicus;Bone Diseases/ci [Chemically Induced];Cocaine-Related Disorders/co [Complications];Female;Humans;Middle Aged;Mouth Diseases/ci [Chemically Induced];Palate, Hard",,"Cocaine; Palatine lesions; Palatine perforation; Recreational drug use",,,,,,"Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.",,"Article" "44185","123456789/35008",,"Palomera, V., Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, km 15.5 carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, C.P. 45110, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Bertin, S., Di.Va.P.R.A., Entomologia e Zoologia Applicate all'Ambiente C. Vidano, University di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (TO), Italy; Rodríguez, A., Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, km 15.5 carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, C.P. 45110, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Bosco, D., Di.Va.P.R.A., Entomologia e Zoologia Applicate all'Ambiente C. Vidano, University di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (TO), Italy; Virla, E., PROPIMI-Biotecnologia, Div. Control Biológico, Av. Belgrano y Pje. Caseros (T4001 MVB), San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina; Moya-Raygoza, G., Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, km 15.5 carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, C.P. 45110, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico",,"Palomera, V.
Bertin, S.
Rodriguez, A.
Bosco, D.
Virla, E.
Moya-Raygoza, G.",,"2012",,"The corn leafhopper Dalbulus maidis (Delong & Wolcott) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) originated in Mexico, but is found from southeastern and southwestern USA to Argentina. Differences in reproductive and phenotypic traits between Mexican (native) and Argentinian (adventive) populations have been previously reported, but information on their genetic variation is currently unavailable. The objective was to investigate possible genetic variability among D. maidis populations collected in Mexico on maize and maize relatives (annual and perennial teosintes) and on maize in Argentina. A region of the mitochondrial gene coding for the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) were sequenced and analyzed. We developed the forward and reverse primers for the DNA amplification of COI in D. maidis (dalCOI). Twenty two and 17 sequences for dalCOI and ITS2, respectively, were generated and analyzed. No genetic variation among Mexican and Argentinian populations was found in the ribosomal region and low genetic variation was found in the mitochondrial region. These results could be explained by the short evolutionary time scale, since both maize and the corn leafhopper moved throughout the Americas only in the most recent millenia, or in part to the limited host range, and thus a limited change in the corn leafhopper associated bacteria.",,,,,,"10.1653/024.095.0123",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/42406","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84860641337&partnerID=40&md5=017cbf25778f0cf058e141e5b7885d11
http://dx.doi.org/10.1653/024.095.0123",,,,,,"1",,"Florida Entomologist",,"150
155",,"95",,"Scopus
BioOne
WOS",,,,,,"adventive; COI; Genetic variation; ITS2; maize; teosintes",,,,,,"Is there any genetic variation among native Mexican and Argentinian populations of Dalbulus maidis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)?",,"Article" "44173","123456789/35008",,"Goldblatt, P., B.A Krukoff Curator of African Botany, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299, United States; Rodriguez, A., University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico; Powell, M.P., Molecular Systematics Section, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond TW9 3DS, United Kingdom; Davies, T.J., National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, United States; Manning, J.C., South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch, Private Bag X7, Cape Town, South Africa; Van Der Bank, M., Botany Department, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa; Savolainen, V., Molecular Systematics Section, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond TW9 3DS, United Kingdom",,"Goldblatt, P.
Rodriguez, A.
Powell, M.P.
Davies, T.J.
Manning, J.C.
Van Der Bank, M.
Savolainen, V.",,"2008",,"The current infrafamilial taxonomy of the Iridaceae recognizes four subfamilies; Isophysidoideae (1: 1); Nivenioideae (6: ca. 92), Iridoideae (29: 890), and Crocoideae (29: 1032). Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of five plastid DNA regions, rbcL, rps4, trnL-F, matK, and rps16, confirm most aspects of this classification and the evolutionary patterns that they imply, importantly the sisiter relationship of Isophysidoideae to the remainder of the family and the monophyly of Iridoideae. Subfamily Nivenioideae is, however, paraphyletic; Crocoideae is consistently found nested within it, sister to the core Nivenioideae, the woody Klattia, Nivenia, and Witsenia. This clade is sister to Aristea, which in turn is sister to the Madagascan Geosiris, and then to the Australasian Patersonia. We treat Aristea, Geosiris, and Patersonia as separate subfamilies, Aristeoideae and the new Geosiridaceae and Patersonioideae, rendering Nivenioideae and Crocoideae monophyletic. The alternative, uniting a widely circumscribed Nivenioideae and Crocoideae, seems undesirable because Nivenioideae have none of the numerous synapomorphies of Crocoideae, and that subfamily includes more than half the total species of Iridaceae. Main synapomorphies of Crocoideae are: pollen operculate; exine perforate; ovule campylotropous; root xylem vessels with simple perforations; rootstock a corm; inflorescence usually a spike; plants deciduous. Four more derived features of Crocoideae are shared only with core Nivenioideae: flowers long-lived; perianth tube well developed; flowers sessile; and septal nectaries present. The genera of the latter subfamily are evergreen shrubs, have monocot-type secondary growth, tangentially flattened seeds, and the inflorescence unit is a binate rhipidium. The latter feature unites core Nivenioideae with Aristea, Geosiris, and Patersonia, which have fugaceous flowers and, with few exceptions, a blue perianth. Molecular-based phylogenetic trees using sequences from five plastid DNA regions now show discrete generic clusters within Crocoideae and Iridoideae, the foundation for the tribal classification. The five tribe classification of Iridoideae, initially based on morphological characters and subsequently supported by a four plastid DNA region sequence analysis, continues to receive support using additional DNA sequences. Application of molecular clock techniques to our phylogeny indicates that the Iridaceae differentiated in the late Cretaceous and diverged from the next most closely related family, Doryanthaceae circa 82 mya, thus during the Campanian. The Tasmanian Isophysis is the only extant member of the clade sister to the remainder of the Iridaceae, from which it may have diverged 66 mya, in the Maastrichtian. The generic phylogeny shows the proximal clades of the family are all Australasian, which corroborates past hypotheses that the Iridaceae originated in Antarctica-Australasia, although its subsequent radiation occurred elsewhere, notably in southern Africa and temperate and highland South America at the end of the Eocene or later. " Copyright 2008 by the American Society of Plant Taxonomists.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/42394
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-51549120141&partnerID=40&md5=10b09728ec59436c67db5b2fe4d70001
http://dx.doi.org/10.1600/036364408785679806
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