Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/44590
Title: Slow pyrolysis of different Brazilian waste biomasses as sources of soil conditioners and energy, and for environmental protection
Author: Arana-Daniel, N.
Gallegos, A.A.
Lopez-Franco, C.
Alanis, A.Y.
Issue Date: 2014
Abstract: An approach to plan smooth paths for mobile robots using a Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network trained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was presented in [1]. Taking the previous approach as an starting point, in this paper it is shown that it is possible to construct a smooth simple global path and then modify this path locally using PSO-RBF, Ferguson splines or Bezier curves trained with PSO, in order to describe more complex paths in partially known environments. Experimental results show that our approach is fast and effective to deal with complex environments. " 2014 IEEE.",,,,,,"10.1109/CEC.2014.6900244",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/44590","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84908564621&partnerID=40&md5=9e059d3b7e3fd8c8d43b50ad225d0127",,,,,,,,"Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, CEC 2014",,"175
182",,,,"Scopus",,,,,,,,,,,,"Smooth global and local path planning for mobile robot using particle swarm optimization, radial basis functions, splines and Bezier curves",,"Conference Paper" "46362","123456789/35008",,"Doumer, M.E., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Paraná - UFPR, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR, Brazil; Arizaga, G.G.C., Department of Chemistry, University of Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, CP 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Silva, D.A.D., Department of Forestry Engineering and Technology, Federal University of Paraná - UFPR, 80210-170 Curitiba, PR, Brazil; Yamamoto, C.I., Department of Chemical Engineering, Automotive Fuel Analysis Laboratory (LACAUT), Federal University of Paraná - UFPR, 81530-990 Curitiba, PR, Brazil; Novotny, E.H., Embrapa Soils, Rua Jardim Botúnico 1024, 22460-000 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; Santos, J.M., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sergipe - UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil; Santos, L.O.D., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sergipe - UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil; Wisniewski, A., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sergipe - UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil; Andrade, J.B.D., National Institute of Science and Technology: Energy and Environment, 40170-290 Salvador, BA, Brazil; Mangrich, A.S., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Paraná - UFPR, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR, Brazil, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sergipe - UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil, National Institute of Science and Technology: Energy and Environment, 40170-290 Salvador, BA, Brazil",,"Doumer, M.E.
Arizaga, G.G.C.
Silva, D.A.D.
Yamamoto, C.I.
Novotny, E.H.
Santos, J.M.
Santos, L.O.D.
Wisniewski, A.
Andrade, J.B.D.
Mangrich, A.S.",,"2015",,"This paper explores the viability of producing energy and agricultural soil conditioners with biochars and bio-oils from the pyrolysis of biomasses that in some cases are potential environmental pollutants. This approach addresses the need to develop sustainable production systems that minimize pollution and soil degradation, and meet the demand for renewable fuels. Large volumes of biomass from different sources are available in Brazil, including Eucalyptus crop residues (CE), castor meal (CM), coconut pericarp (CP), sugarcane bagasse (SB), and water hyacinth (WH). CM char and SB bio-oil are good prospects for energy generation. Characterization using DRIFT, 13C NMR, and van Krevelen diagrams indicated that after carbonization, aromatic structures were predominant in the biochars produced from the CP, CE, and SB biomasses, while aliphatic groups were abundant in the biochars from CM and WH. Analysis using EPR showed that unpaired electrons were preferentially located on carbon atoms in the case of the CP, CE, and SB biochars, with EPR g values around 2.0030, while the CM and WH biochars presented g values around 2.0035, indicating that the unpaired electrons were closer to oxygen atoms. In terms of bio-oil chemical composition, the most abundant compounds were 3-pyridinol and furans (WH), phenols (CP), and hexadecanoic, octadecanoic, 9,12-octadecenoic (z,z), 3-docosenoic, and 5-docosenoic acids (present only in the CM bio-oil). The bio-oils from SB and CE were quite similar and the main compound was 1,2,6-hexanetriol. The biomass sources studied produced reasonable amounts of bio-oil, and could compete as suitable raw materials for biofuel production. " 2015 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/44583
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84927553882&partnerID=40&md5=826561f407c06554fa2cd307b6434369
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