Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41691
Title: Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Guadalajara, Mexico and identification of a rare multidrug resistant Beijing genotype
Author: Paz-García, D.A.
Chavez-Romo, H.E.
Correa-Sandoval, F.
Reyes-Bonilla, H.
Lopez-Perez, A.
Medina-Rosas, P.
Hernandez-Cortes, M.P.
Issue Date: 2012
Abstract: Genetic connectivity was studied in two scleractinian corals, Pocillopora damicornis (branching and broadcast spawner) and Pontes panamensis (massive and brooding type), along the Pacific coast of Mexico. Allelic diversity between adults and juveniles, the latter recruited after the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) 19971998 event, was determined, and level of genetic connectivity among populations was assessed. There were no significant differences in allelic diversity between adults and juveniles from the same location. Seascape spatial genetic analysis suggested two or three clusters, depending on the species: (1) Bahas de Huatulco, (2) south of the Baja California Peninsula and Baha de Banderas, and (3) locations in the Gulf of California. The most important barrier to gene flow was detected between Baha de Banderas and Bahas de Huatulco and corresponds with a major coastal stretch of sandy beaches and lagoons. Moderate to high gene flow was found inside and at the entrance of the Gulf of California (Nem = 62250), possibly favored by seasonal circulation patterns and sexual reproduction. In contrast, low gene flow was observed between southern populations and the rest of coastal Mexico (Nem < 1.7) based on high local recruitment and habitat discontinuity. A close genetic relationship of corals from the southern part of the Baja California Peninsula and severely damaged Baha de Banderas coral communities confirmed that exchange of propagules could have taken place between the localities after the ENSO 19971998 event. Despite different reproductive strategies, both species showed similar patterns, suggesting the importance of surficial currents and habitat discontinuity to predict connectivity among coral reefs. " 2012 by University of Hawai'i Press All rights reserved.",,,,,,"10.2984/66.1.3",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41691","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856501027&partnerID=40&md5=217725d1436425906d1936f2a041de71
http://dx.doi.org/10.2984/66.1.3",,,,,,"1",,"Pacific Science",,"43
61",,"66",,"Scopus
BioOne
WOS",,,,,,,,,,,,"Genetic connectivity patterns of corals pocillopora damicornis and porites panamensis (Anthozoa: Scleractinia) along the west coast of Mexico",,"Article" "43490","123456789/35008",,"Van Heerwaarden, J., Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United States; Doebley, J., Department of Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, United States; Briggs, W.H., Syngenta Seeds, 1601 BK, Enkhuizen, Netherlands; Glaubitz, J.C., Institute for Genomic Diversity, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States; Goodman, M.M., Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States; Gonzalez, J.D.J.S., Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas Y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Zapopan, Jalisco CP45110, Mexico; Ross-Ibarra, J., Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United States",,"Van Heerwaarden, J.
Doebley, J.
Briggs, W.H.
Glaubitz, J.C.
Goodman, M.M.
Gonzalez, J.D.J.S.
Ross-Ibarra, J.",,"2011",,"The last two decades have seen important advances in our knowledge of maize domestication, thanks in part to the contributions of genetic data. Genetic studies have provided firm evidence that maize was domesticated from Balsas teosinte (Zea mays subspecies parviglumis), a wild relative that is endemic to the mid- to lowland regions of southwestern Mexico. An interesting paradox remains, however: Maize cultivars that are most closely related to Balsas teosinte are found mainly in the Mexican highlands where subspecies parviglumis does not grow. Genetic data thus point to primary diffusion of domesticated maize from the highlands rather than from the region of initial domestication. Recent archeological evidence for early lowland cultivation has been consistent with the genetics of domestication, leaving the issue of the ancestral position of highland maize unresolved. We used a new SNP dataset scored in a large number of accessions of both teosinte and maize to take a second look at the geography of the earliest cultivated maize. We found that gene flow between maize and its wild relatives meaningfully impacts our inference of geographic origins. By analyzing differentiation from inferred ancestral gene frequencies, we obtained results that are fully consistent with current ecological, archeological, and genetic data concerning the geography of early maize cultivation.",,,,,,"10.1073/pnas.1013011108",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41711","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-79551619812&partnerID=40&md5=e2d3d8f1735251a6ea918236e74e9f51",,,,,,"3",,"Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",,"1088
1092",,"108",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,,,,,,,"Genetic signals of origin, spread, and introgression in a large sample of maize landraces",,"Article" "43462","123456789/35008",,"Weigle, J.C., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States; Luhrs, C.C., Department of Chemistry, University of Guadalajara, Barragan 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco 44480, Mexico; Chen, C.K., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States; Perry, W.L., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States; Mang, J.T., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States; Nemer, M.B., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States; Lopez, G.P., Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 8713, United States; Phillips, J., Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 8713, United States",,"Weigle, J.C.
Luhrs, C.C.
Chen, C.K.
Perry, W.L.
Mang, J.T.
Nemer, M.B.
Lopez, G.P.
Phillips, J.",,"2004",,"Nanoparticles of aluminum metal were generated by passing an aerosol of micrometer-scale (mean 50 ?m) particles in argon through an atmospheric pressure plasma torch operated at less than 1000 W. A designed experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of plasma gas flow rate, aerosol gas flow rate, and applied power on the shape, size, and size distribution of the final particles. The size and shape of the metal particles were dramatically impacted by the operating parameters employed. At relatively low powers or at high powers and short residence times, virtually all the particles are spherical. Under other conditions, the particles had spherical heads, and virtually all had tails, some quite long. The particle size distributions also were influenced by the operating conditions. Under most conditions the size distributions were log-normal, consistent with growth by agglomeration. However, under some conditions, the population of particles above or below the mode was far too great to be consistent with a log-normal distribution. For example, the particle distributions tend to show an unusual concentration of very small particles at relatively short residence times and low aluminum feed rates. The distributions tend to show an unusual concentration of large particles at relatively long residence times and high aluminum feed rates. On the basis of the data collected, some simple models of the mechanism of nanoparticle formation were postulated which should be of value in future studies of the process.",,,,,,"10.1021/jp049410q",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41683","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-10444275857&partnerID=40&md5=d0a1580a17e459de316ccc8e91a4bb95
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp049410q",,,,,,"48",,"Journal of Physical Chemistry B",,"18601
18607",,"108",,"Scopus
ChemAbsS
WOS",,,,,,,,,,,,"Generation of aluminum nanoparticles using an atmospheric pressure plasma torch",,"Article" "43519","123456789/35008",,"Vázquez, H.C., Laboratorio de Mastitis y diagnostico molecular, Depto. de Medicina Veterinaria, CUCBA, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5 Carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, C.P.45110 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Jäger, S., Landesbetrieb Hessisches Landeslabor, Schubertstrasse 6, D-35396 Giessen, Germany; Wolter, W., Landesbetrieb Hessisches Landeslabor, Schubertstrasse 6, D-35396 Giessen, Germany; Zschöck, M., Landesbetrieb Hessisches Landeslabor, Schubertstrasse 6, D-35396 Giessen, Germany; Vazquez, M.A.C., Laboratorio de Mastitis y diagnostico molecular, Depto. de Medicina Veterinaria, CUCBA, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5 Carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, C.P.45110 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Sayed, A.E., Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Giza Square, Egypt",,"Vazquez, H.C.
Jager, S.
Wolter, W.
Zschock, M.
Vazquez, M.A.C.
Sayed, A.E.",,"2011",,"In the present work, Staphyloccous aureus field strains were isolated from 27 mastitic cows representing 12 dairy herds. This was selected of almost 3,000 field strains of mastitic cows. The strains were subjected to different Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to detect the toxin encoding genes SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEJ and TST genes. The investigated strains were then subjected to fingerprinting by the means of Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). The screening for the previously mentioned toxin encoding genes revealed the absence of all toxin encoding genes with the exception of SEI which could be detected in a single strain. Meanwhile, the data obtained through the PFGE analysis indicated the close relationship of S. aureus field strains responsible for the induction of mastitis in western Mexico.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41740","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-80555154140&partnerID=40&md5=0d2af87b07b492329b76860fcc431bed",,,,,,"4",,"Revista Cientifica de la Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias de la Universidad del Zulia",,"308
316",,"21",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,"Bovine mastitis; Enterotoxins; Genotipic relationship; Molecular biology; Patogenic bacterius; Staphylococcus aureus",,,,,,"Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from dairy herds in Mexico",,"Article" "43511","123456789/35008",,"Espinoza, B., Departamento de Inmunología, Inst. de Investigations Biomedicas, UNAM. Cd. Univ. Nac. Autonoma de M., 04510 D.F. A.P, 70228, Mexico City, Mexico; Vera-Cruz, J.M., Depto. de Farmacobiología, Ctro. Univ. de Cie. Exact. e I., Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico; González, H., Depto. de Farmacobiología, Ctro. Univ. de Cie. Exact. e I., Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico; Ortega, E., Departamento de Inmunología, Inst. de Investigations Biomedicas, UNAM. Cd. Univ. Nac. Autonoma de M., 04510 D.F. A.P, 70228, Mexico City, Mexico; Hernández, R., Depto. de Biología Molecular, Inst. de Invest. Biomédicas, Univ. Nac. Autónoma de Mexico, 04510 D.F. A.P. 70228, Mexico City, Mexico",,"Espinoza, B.
Vera-Cruz, J.M.
Gonzalez, H.
Ortega, E.
Hernandez, R.",,"1998",,"Five Trypanosoma cruzi stocks were isolated from infected patients in the central state of Jalisco, Mexico. Parasites were isolated by direct inoculation of infected blood into BALB/c mice. The five stocks of T. cruzi were analyzed for in vitro growth, and for virulence and parasitic load in vivo. Furthermore, a genetic analysis based on restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with a repetitive element from the rRNA gene spacer was performed. No differences in in vitro growth or in parasitic load in vivo were found among the stocks. While three stocks showed low virulence for mice, the other two stocks killed 80 and 100% of the infected mice. In addition, Southern blot of total DNA hybridized with a repetitive element from the rRNA gene spacer showed two clearly distinct patterns that correlated with the observed ability of the stocks to kill infected mice. Our results show a correlation among the ability to kill BALB/c mice, the genetic pattern and clinical symptoms produced by the different stocks in the infected patients. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.",,,,,,"10.1016/S0001-706X(98)00005-9",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41732","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-17644442993&partnerID=40&md5=60341ffc720ff2501ebc442072a8f69f",,,,,,"1",,"Acta Tropica",,"63
72",,"70",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,"Genetic characterization; Growth rate; Trypanosoma cruzi; Virulence",,,,,,"Genotype and virulence correlation within Mexican stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from patients",,"Article" "45069","123456789/35008",,"Roman, F.R.S., Unidad de Investigación en Salud en el Trabajo CMN Siglo XXI, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Spain; Estrada, J.G.S., Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico",,"Roman, F.R.S.
Estrada, J.G.S.",,"2012",,"Occupational Medicine (OM) aims to promote and maintain the highest degree of physical, mental and social well-being of workers, protecting them against all kinds of risk, adapt the work and its environment to psycho-physiological capabilities. In general, OM has followed two trends derived from the hegemonic medical model: one that focuses its essence to care and compensation and another that were limited to the prevention of accidents and work diseases. This has earned the criticism of other disciplines that perceive OM as a little known area, more focused to the organic and functional to the psycho-social. This review describes the paradigms of health sciences; work as a social process linked to the health-disease process; it takes the concept of disease cultural history and highlights the value of the study of quality of work life.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/43290","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865830988&partnerID=40&md5=4f2e17891fde3f8ffd868e24f1d8e1f6",,,,,,"2",,"Revista de la Asociacion Espanola de Especialistas en Medicina del Trabajo",,"42
43",,"21",,"Scopus",,,,,,"Cultural history of disease; Health disease process; Occupational medicine; Quality of work life; Work",,,,,,"Occupational medicine and quality of work life: Toward an integrative approach [Medicina del trabajo y calidad de vida en el trabajo: Hacia un enfoque integrador]",,"Review" "43478","123456789/35008",,"Flores-Treviño, S., Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónMonterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; Morfín-Otero, R., Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Instituto de Patología Infecciosa Y Experimental, Universidad de GuadalajaraGuadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Rodríguez-Noriega, E., Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Instituto de Patología Infecciosa Y Experimental, Universidad de GuadalajaraGuadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; González-Díaz, E., Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Instituto de Patología Infecciosa Y Experimental, Universidad de GuadalajaraGuadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Pérez-Gómez, H.R., Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Instituto de Patología Infecciosa Y Experimental, Universidad de GuadalajaraGuadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Bocanegra-García, V., Laboratorio de Medicina de Conservación, Centro de Biotecnología Genómica, Instituto Politécnico NacionalReynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico; Vera-Cabrera, L., Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónMonterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; Garza-González, E., Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónMonterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico, Departamento de Patología Clínica, Hospital Universitario Dr. JoséEleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónMonterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico",,"Flores-Trevino, S.
Morfin-Otero, R.
Rodriguez-Noriega, E.
Gonzalez-Diaz, E.
Perez-Gomez, H.R.
Bocanegra-García, V.
Vera-Cabrera, L.
Garza-Gonzalez, E.",,"2015",,"Determining the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis strains allows identification of the distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes responsible for tuberculosis in different regions. Several studies have reported the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis strains in Mexico, but little information is available from the state of Jalisco. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Western Mexico. Sixty-eight M. tuberculosis isolates were tested for susceptibility to first-line drugs using manual Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube method and genotyped using spoligotyping and IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern analyses. Forty-seven (69.1%) isolates were grouped into 10 clusters and 21 isolates displayed single patterns by spoligotyping. Three of the 21 single patterns corresponded to orphan patterns in the SITVITWEB database, and 1 new type that contained 2 isolates was created. The most prevalent lineages were T (38.2%), Haarlem (17.7%), LAM (17.7%), X (7.4%), S (5.9%), EAI (1.5%) and Beijing (1.5%). Six (12.8%) of the clustered isolates were MDR, and type 406 of the Beijing family was among the MDR isolates. Seventeen (26.2%) isolates were grouped into 8 clusters and 48 isolates displayed single patterns by IS6110-RFLP. Combination of IS6110-RFLP and spoligotyping reduced the clustering rate to 20.0%. The results show that T, Haarlem, and LAM are predominant lineages among clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis in Guadalajara, Mexico. Clustering rates indicated low transmission of MDR strains. We detected a rare Beijing genotype, SIT406, which was a highly resistant strain. This is the first report of this Beijing genotype in Latin America. " 2015 Flores-Treviño et al.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/41699
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84923250529&partnerID=40&md5=7f9d09c6e2c006bb833db38472b86534
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=prem&AN=25695431
Appears in Collections:Producción científica UdeG

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in RIUdeG are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.