Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39955
Title: Changes in Extracellular Glutamate Levels in Rat Orbitofrontal Cortex During Sleep and Wakefulness
Author: Gonzalez-Solis, J.L.
Martinez-Espinosa, J.C.
Torres-Gonzalez, L.A.
Aguilar-Lemarroy, A.
Jave-Suarez, L.F.
Palomares-Anda, P.
Issue Date: 2014
Abstract: The use of Raman spectroscopy to analyze the biochemical composition of serum samples and hence distinguish between normal and cervical cancer serum samples was investigated. The serum samples were obtained from 19 patients who were clinically diagnosed with cervical cancer, 3 precancer, and 20 healthy volunteer controls. The imprint was put under an Olympus microscope, and around points were chosen for Raman measurement.All spectra were collected at a Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830-nm wavelength and 17-mW power irradiation. Raw spectra were processed by carrying out baseline correction, smoothing, andnormalization to remove noise, florescence, and shot noise and then analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The control serum spectrum showed the presence of higher amounts of carotenoids indicated by peaks at 1,002, 1,160, and 1,523 cm-1and intense peaks associated with protein components at 754, 853, 938, 1,002, 1,300-1,345, 1,447, 1,523, 1,550, 1,620, and 1,654 cm-1. The Raman bands assigned to glutathione (446, 828, and 1,404 cm-1) and tryptophan (509, 1,208, 1,556, 1,603, and 1,620 cm-1) in cervical cancer were higher than those of control samples, suggesting that their presence may also play a role in cervical cancer. Furthermore, weak bands in the control samples attributed to tryptophan (545, 760, and 1,174 cm-1) and amide III (1,234-1,290 cm -1) seem to disappear and decrease in the cervical cancer samples, respectively. It is shown that the serum samples from patients with cervical cancer and from the control group can be discriminated with high sensitivity and specificity when the multivariate statistical methods of PCA is applied to Raman spectra. PCA allowed us to define the wavelength differences between the spectral bands of the control and cervical cancer groups by confirming that the main molecular differences among the control and cervical cancer samples were glutathione, tryptophan, ? carotene, and amide III. The preliminary results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a highly effective technique with a strong potential of support for current techniques as Papanicolaou smear by reducing the number of these tests; nevertheless, with the construction of a data library integrated with a large number of cervical cancer and control Raman spectra obtained from a wide range of healthy and cervical cancer population, Raman-PCA technique could be converted into a new technique for noninvasive real-time diagnosis of cervical cancer from serum samples. " 2013 Springer-Verlag.",,,,,,"10.1007/s10103-013-1447-6",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39955","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84902660796&partnerID=40&md5=7042abac4fded12fae35957588615c04
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=prem&AN=24197519",,,,,,"3",,"Lasers in Medical Science",,"979
985",,"29",,"Scopus
WOS
MEDLINE",,,,"Index Medicus",,"Cervical cancer; Principal component analysis; Raman spectroscopy; Serum",,,,,,"Cervical cancer detection based on serum sample Raman spectroscopy",,"Article" "41743","123456789/35008",,"Pérez, G., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; de la Peña, M.E., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Esparza, A., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Mejía, A., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Vázquez, V., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Aguilar Luna, J.C., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; González, J., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; López-Guido, B., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Ornelas, M.L., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.; Ibarra, B., División de Genética, Unidad de Investigación Biomédica, CMO, IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.",,"Perez, G.
de la Pena, M.E.
Esparza, A.
Mejia, A.
Vazquez, V.
Aguilar Luna, J.C.
Gonzalez, J.
Lopez-Guido, B.
Ornelas, M.L.
Ibarra, B.",,"1990",,"Hb alterations studied throughout 2 years in 129 patients are reported, these patients had hemolytic anemia or the possibility of a hemoglobinopathy : 5 were heterozygotes to thalassemia b; 3 were compound-heterozygote of thalassemia a1 and thalassemia a2; 2 for thalassemia b and 2 for thalassemia b and Hb S; 2 homozygotes and 2 heterozygotes for Hb S; 2 was bearing unstable Hb and the other had Hereditary Persistence of Hb F. These results allow the conclusion that thalassemia is the Hb alteration which most frequently causes hemolytic anemia in our population and underscores the importance of the study of these pathologies in selected populations.",,,,,,,,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39964","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0025501027&partnerID=40&md5=992dad8c6b77fb7aee0b31cbcf08b24e",,,,,,"4",,"Archivos de Investigacion Medica",,"385
388",,"21",,"Scopus",,,,,,,,,,,,"Changes in hemoglobin in patients with hemolytic anemia [Alteraciones de la hemoglobina en pacientes con anemia hemolética.]",,"Article" "41750","123456789/35008",,,,"Marshall,Elaine
Newton,Adrian C.",,"2003",,,,,,,,"10.1021/ma981703s",,"0013-0001","http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39971","http://dx.doi.org/10.1663/0013-0001(2003)057[0262:NFPITC]2.0.CO;2",,,,"The New York Botanical Garden",,"2",,"Economic Botany",,"262
278",,"57",,"BioOne",,,,,,,,,,,,"Non-Timber Forest Products in the Community of El Terrero, Sierra de Manantlán Biosphere Reserve, Mexico: Is Their Use Sustainable?",,"Journal Article" "41740","123456789/35008",,"Hernndez-Zendejas, G., Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Guadalajara Medical College, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, Jalisco Institute for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, Ruben Daro 420, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Guerrerosantos, J., Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Guadalajara Medical College, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, Jalisco Institute for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico",,"Hernndez-Zendejas, G.
Guerrerosantos, J.",,"2000",,"This report describes the detailed construction, experimental basis, and clinical application of a reliable double microvascular clamp that can be built from inexpensive parts that are readily available. Twenty-five clinical free-tissue transfers were performed using this clamp with an acceptable free-flap survival rate. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.",,,,,,"10.1002/1098-2752(2000)20:4<207
210",,"20",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,,,,,,,"Challenging the limits: Build your own reliable double microvascular clamps",,"Article" "41747","123456789/35008",,"Calvo-Vargas, C.G., Cardiovascular Research Unit, New Civ. Hosp. Guadalajara, Univ. G., Guadalajara, Mexico; Parra Carrillo, J.Z., Cardiovascular Research Unit, New Civ. Hosp. Guadalajara, Univ. G., Guadalajara, Mexico; Grover Páez, F., Cardiovascular Research Unit, New Civ. Hosp. Guadalajara, Univ. G., Guadalajara, Mexico; Fonseca Reyes, S., Cardiovascular Research Unit, New Civ. Hosp. Guadalajara, Univ. G., Guadalajara, Mexico",,"Calvo-Vargas, C.G.
Parra Carrillo, J.Z.
Grover Paez, F.
Fonseca Reyes, S.",,"1998",,"In developing countries, the cost of antihypertensive medications is one of the principal limiting factors when trying to treat patients with high blood pressure. To determine the changes in cost (in US dollars) of these medications and in the percentage of the minimum wage needed to purchase them, two cost studies (1990 and 1996) done in Mexico were compared. The yearly cost of a treatment with hydrochlorothiazide was US $13.80 in 1990; in 1996 it was US $10.92. Both figures represent 1.1% of the minimum wage that was in effect at the time. Propranolol hydrochloride cost US $50.52 for a year's treatment in 1990, and US $66.12 for the same in 1996. These figures represented, respectively, 4.2% and 6.7% of the minimum wage of 1990 and 1996. The annual cost for nifedipine was US $176.76 in 1990 (14.7% of the minimum wage) and US $242.16 in 1996 (24.8% of the minimum wage). The yearly cost of enalapril was US $233.04 in 1990 and US $433.20 in 1996; these costs represented, respectively, 19.4% and 44.2% of the minimum wage. The comparison of these two cost studies (1990 and 1996) shows why Mexico's population is finding it more difficult to purchase antihypertensive medications. Higher costs and reduced purchasing power seem to be the two principal factors causing this. This is probably affecting the population's health, as it is more difficult to control high blood pressure without proper treatment.",,,,,,"10.1016/S0895-7061(97)00459-7",,,"http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39968","http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345215179&partnerID=40&md5=bd0c5ddfc1679c56bd9b15000c130a16",,,,,,"4 I",,"American Journal of Hypertension",,"487
493",,"11",,"Scopus
WOS",,,,,,"Cost of antihypertensive medications; Developing countries; High blood pressure",,,,,,"Changes in the costs of antihypertensive medications in a developing country: A study in Mexico comparing 1990 and 1996",,"Article" "41742","123456789/35008",,"Lopez-Rodriguez, F., Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Brain Research Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Medina-Ceja, L., Departamento de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; Wilson, C.L., Brain Research Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States, Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Jhung, D., Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Morales-Villagran, A., Departamento de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico",,"Lopez-Rodriguez, F.
Medina-Ceja, L.
Wilson, C.L.
Jhung, D.
Morales-Villagran, A.",,"2007",,"Background: Functional neuroimaging studies have shown that limbic and paralimbic areas display increased activity during REM sleep when compared to wakefulness. This increase in limbic activity is specific to the REM period of sleep. PET scanners do not provide a neurochemical explanation for this increased activity during REM sleep. In order to better understand the neurochemical basis of this increase, extracellular glutamate levels were measured in the rat orbitofrontal cortex during the stages of sleep and wakefulness. Methods: EEG and EMG activity were registered to score the behavioral state in epochs of 15 sec into three stages: wakefulness, non-REM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. To correlate the glutamate concentration of the orbitofrontal cortex with sleep-wake states, 1-min dialysate samples were taken and classified as wakefulness, non-REM or REM sleep if all four of the 15-sec epochs occurring during the collection of that sample and after correction for dead time corresponded to the respective state. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection was used to measure glutamate levels. Results: Glutamate levels of the orbitofrontal cortex were increased during REM sleep, diminished during wakefulness, and the lowest levels were found during non-REM sleep. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate an increase in the concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the orbitofrontal cortex during REM sleep, which could be related to the increased activity in paralimbic structures observed in humans using functional neuroimaging, as well as to the proposed role of REM sleep on retention of emotional memories. " 2007 IMSS.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12104/39963
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845467113&partnerID=40&md5=033e6232f1f380ab0d9f23642babc1d5
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